14 Potential Justifications For An Invasion Of Libya By The U.S. Military That Are Currently Being Floated In The Mainstream Media

March 3, 2011 by admin  
Filed under Featured Stories, US News, World News

Published on 03-02-2011

Source: The American Dream

Over the past couple of days, top government officials from both the United States and the EU have been openly discussing the possibility of military intervention in Libya. In fact, it has seemed like there has been a full court press in the mainstream media to sway public opinion toward supporting a potential invasion.  We are being told that we simply cannot stand by as Libyan civilians die.  We are being told that this would be a “humanitarian” mission.  We are being told that this would not be like Iraq or Afghanistan.  Even now, the U.S. military is moving the USS Enterprise and other warships closer to Libya in case they are “needed”.  Other nations are also sending warships into the Mediterranean and are preparing for military action.  It really does appear that authorities in the United States and Europe really are serious about potentially going into Libya.  But is there really any way that the United States can really justify getting involved in another war in the Middle East?  Will the American people ever be convinced that an invasion of Libya by the U.S. military is a good idea?

Fortunately, so far it appears that the mainstream media propaganda is not working.  A recent Rasmussen poll found that a whopping 67 percent of Americans do not want the U.S. to get more involved in the unrest going on in Arab countries and only 17 percent of Americans do want the U.S. to get more directly involved.

But that doesn’t mean that top politicians in the U.S. and in Europe are not going to continue to try to change our minds.

British Prime Minister David Cameron sure sounds like he is ready to go to war….

“If Col Gaddafi uses military force against his own people, the world cannot stand by.”

On Monday, Hillary Clinton made it clear that the U.S. government considers military action to be very much “on the table”….

“Nothing is off the table so long as the Libyan Government continues to threaten and kill Libyans.”

It is almost as if they want us to believe that their hands are being forced.

Of course nobody in the mainstream media seems to be bringing up the fact that the United States has stood idly by and watched millions and millions of Africans be slaughtered in bloody civil wars and genocides over the past couple of decades.

For decades the U.S. has looked upon the suffering of millions of Africans with indifference but now they are trying to convince us that it is a “moral imperative” that we intervene in the civil war in Libya.

It is funny how things can change when oil is at stake.  Libya is the biggest producer of oil in Africa and that makes it a very important nation to the global elite.

Fortunately, it appears that the American people are starting to get sick and tired of sending our young men and women off to the Middle East to fight these endless wars.

American blood should never be spent cheaply.  Each American life is precious, and our military men and women should never be sacrificed unless there is a darn good reason for it.

Well, right now the global elite are working overtime to try to create some “good reasons” for going into Libya.

The following are 14 potential justifications for an invasion of Libya by the U.S. military that are currently being floated in the mainstream media….

 

#1 “We Can’t Stand Aside And Watch Gaddafi Kill His Own People”

#2 “It Would Just Be A Humanitarian Mission”

#3 “Libya Is Torturing Prisoners

#4 “The Libyan Rebels Will Not Be Able To Take Down Gaddhafi With Our Help”

#5 “U.S. Interests Are Being Threatened”

#6 “Gaddafi Is Crazy”

#7 “Gaddafi Has Weapons Of Mass Destruction

#8 “Gaddafi Will Use Chemical Weapons If We Don’t Stop Him”

#9 “Gaddafi Has “1,000 Metric Tons Of Uranium Yellowcake

#10 “European Energy Companies Are Deeply Invested In Libyan Oil And Gas Fields”

#11 “Millions of Dollars Worth Of Infrastructure Will Be Destroyed If We Don’t Intervene”

#12 “The Crisis In Libya Is Bad For The Global Economy”

#13 “Someone Has To Protect The Oil”

#14 “We Have Got To Go Into Libya To Keep Al-Qaeda From Getting A Foothold”

Al-Qaeda?

Really?

Yes, they are being trotted out once again as a reason for us to invade someone.

A recent article in Time Magazine made the following claim….

“U.S. counterterrorism officials have noted the disproportionate number of Libyans turning up in the ranks of al-Qaeda both in northern Africa and in Iraq.”

You can always count on Time Magazine for some good government propaganda.

Hopefully the American people will not fall for this nonsense.

But it looks like it is not just going to be the U.S. military that is going to be involved.  This is already being framed as a “NATO operation”, and we are being told that a direct invasion will probably not happen immediately.

Rather, we are told that a “no fly zone” would likely be set up first and special forces troops may be sent in to help “advise” the rebel forces.

Well, the truth is that the moment that we shoot down one Libyan plane or we insert one U.S. solider into the country we are at war.

In fact, the Pakistan Observer is reporting that hundreds of “defense advisers” from the United States, the U.K. and France have already landed in Libya and are helping to train rebel forces.

Let us hope that the Pakistan Observer report and other similar reports in the international media are not true.

The American people are sick and tired of using the U.S. military as the police of the world.  The Libyan civil war belongs to the Libyan people and it should stay that way.

No mater how it is justified, if the U.S. military does go into Libya the Libyan people and most of the rest of the world are going to deeply resent it.

So what do you think?  Do you believe that it would be a good idea or a bad idea for the U.S. to get involved in the civil war in Libya?  Please feel free to leave a comment with your opinion below….

Is the end nigh for Mubarak? More than 250,000 join ‘million-strong’ march to wrest power from president’s grip

February 1, 2011 by admin  
Filed under Featured Stories, US News, World News

By Daily Mail Reporter
Last updated at 6:20 PM on 1st February 2011

Rumours abound that President Mubarak has fled to Bahrain

  • Military holding good to pledge not to fire on peaceful protesters
  • King Abdullah of Jordan sacks prime ministers after protests
  • 18,000 passengers stranded at Cairo Airport in dash to escape
  • Foreign Office to send charter planes tomorrow to pick up British tourists
  • Netanyhu fears Egypt will become radical Islamic state ‘like Iran’
  • Google provides a Twitter lifeline after last internet provider shuts down
  • Protesters against the political regime in Egypt gathered in their tens of thousands today in Cairo for the biggest show of opposition yet to president Hosni Mubarak.

    The numbers, estimated this evening at around 250,000, were way short of the million called for by demonstration leaders but were continuing to grow all the time after military guarantees they would not be fired upon.

    As protesters continued to stream into Tahrir, or Liberation, Square, among them people defying a government transportation shutdown to make their way from rural provinces, rumours were rife that Mubarak had fled to Bahrain.

    The crowd was jammed in shoulder to shoulder – schoolteachers, farmers, unemployed university graduates, women in conservative headscarves and women in high heels, men in suits and working-class men in scuffed shoes.

    They sang nationalist songs and chanted the anti-Mubarak ‘Leave! Leave! Leave!’ as military helicopters buzzed overhead.

    Venting their anger: Protesters in a 250,00-strong crowd voice their opposition to the regime in Cairo today

    Venting their anger: Protesters in a 250,00-strong crowd voice their opposition to the regime in Cairo today

    Preparing for long night: Protesters continued to file into Tahrir Square all day with banners, many of them in English, demanding Mubarak's removal

    Preparing for long night: Protesters continued to file into Tahrir Square all day with banners, many of them in English, demanding Mubarak’s removal

    Praying for peace: The protesters kneel towards Mecca ahead of the eighth day of street demonstrations in Cairo

    Praying for peace: The protesters kneel towards Mecca ahead of the eighth day of street demonstrations in Cairo

    ISRAEL FEARS EGYPT COULD BECOME A RADICAL ISLAMIC REGIME – LIKE IRAN

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said on Monday he feared Egypt could end up with a radical Islamic regime like in Iran.

    Netanyahu’s comments were his sharpest since protests began last week demanding the overthrow of President Hosni Mubarak, Israel’s most significant and oldest ally in the Arab world.

    ‘Our real fear is of a situation that could develop … and which has already developed in several countries including Iran itself – repressive regimes of radical Islam,’ he told a news conference alongside visiting German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

    Netanyahu said he hoped Israel’s three-decade-old peace treaty with Egypt would survive any changes that were taking place in Cairo.

    ‘We are all following with vigilance, with worry and hope that indeed the peace and stability will be preserved,’ he said, alluding to the treaty Israel signed with Egypt in 1979, its first of two with an Arab nation.

    Soldiers at checkpoints set up the entrances of the square did nothing to stop the crowds from entering.

    Protesters also gathered in at least
    five other cities across Egypt, confident there would be no heavy-handed
    military tactics after the army statement, aired on state TV last
    night, which promised to recognise ‘the legitimacy of the people’s
    demands’.

    It was the strongest sign yet that it
    is willing to let the protests continue and even grow as long as they
    remain peaceful – regardless of whether it leads to the fall of Mubarak.

    Organisers had even hoped as many as two million people might take to the streets after last night’s flag-waving and slogan chanting took place in an almost jolly atmosphere.

    A curfew was ignored for the fourth straight day and this morning prayers were undertaken peacefully in Tahrir Square before getting down to the real business of the day: ousting Mubarak, 82, after three decades in power.

    ‘This is the end for him. It’s time,’ said Musab Galal, a 23-year-old unemployed university graduate who came by minibus with his friends from the Nile Delta city of Menoufiya

    The president’s attempts to defuse the crisis so far have fallen flat and failed to appease the gathering demonstrators.

    His main political ally, the United
    States, has also roundly rejected his efforts and announcement of a new
    government yesterday, which dropped his highly unpopular interior
    minister, who heads the police forces, and has been widely denounced by
    the protesters.

    Demonstrators were equally unimpressed by the measures.

    Lighting up the scene: The sun sets on Tahrir Square and a day which passed off peacefully

    Lighting up the scene: The sun sets on Tahrir Square and a day which passed off peacefully – with the military holding good on its promise not to fire on the protesters

    Staking out ground: Soldiers position tanks to guard the television building in Cairo. Many roads have been shut and public transport cancelled

    Staking out ground: Soldiers position tanks to guard the television building in Cairo. Many roads have been shut and public transport cancelled

    Youthful zeal: Young children climbed up on a tank to show the friendly nature of the protest today

    Youthful zeal: Young children climbed up on a tank to show the friendly nature of the protest today

    Peace blossoms: Two Egyptians hand a long-stemmmed flower to an Egyptian soldier in an armoured personnel carrier in Cairo

    Peace blossoms: Two Egyptians hand a long-stemmmed flower to an Egyptian soldier in an armoured personnel carrier in Cairo

    JORDAN’S PRIME MINISTER SACKED

    Jordan’s King Abdullah II fired his government today in the wake of street protests and asked an ex-prime minister to form a new Cabinet.

    The dismissal follows several large protests across Jordan calling for the resignation of Samir Rifai, who is blamed for a rise in fuel and food prices and slowed political reforms.

    A Royal Palace statement said Abdullah accepted Rifai’s resignation tendered earlier. The king named Marouf al-Bakhit as his prime minister-designate, instructing him to ‘undertake quick and tangible steps for real political reforms, which reflect our vision for comprehensive modernisation and development in Jordan’.

    Al-Bakhit previously served as Jordan’s premier from 2005-2007.

    The king also stressed that economic reform was a ‘necessity to provide a better life for our people, but we won’t be able to attain that without real political reforms, which must increase popular participation in the decision-making.’

    He asked al-Bakhit for a ‘comprehensive assessment… to correct the mistakes of the past.’

    King Abdullah vowed to press ahead with political reforms initiated by his late father, King Hussein, when he inherited the crown in 1999.

    Those reforms paved the way for the first parliamentary election in 1989 after a 22-year gap, the revival of a multiparty system and the suspension of martial law in effect since the 1948 Arab-Israeli war.

    The protesters were more organised than on previous days. Volunteers wearing tags reading ‘the People’s Security’ circulated through the crowds, saying they were watching for government infiltrators who might try to instigate violence.

    ‘We will throw out anyone who tries to create trouble,’ one announced over a loudspeaker. Other volunteers joined the soldiers at the checkpoints, searching bags of those entering for weapons. Organisers said the protest would remain in the square and not attempt to march to avoid frictions with the military.

    Two dummies representing Mubarak were hung from traffic lights. On their chests was written: ‘We want to put the murderous president on trial.’

    Their faces were scrawled with the
    Star of David, an allusion to many protesters’ feeling that Mubarak is a
    friend of Israel, still seen by most Egyptians as their country’s
    archenemy more than 30 years after the two nations signed a peace
    treaty.

    Every protester had
    their own story of why they came – with a shared theme of frustration
    with a life pinned in by corruption, low wages, crushed opportunites and
    abuse by authorities.

    Sahar Ahmad, a 41-year-old school
    teacher and mother of one, said she has taught for 22 years and still
    only makes about $70 a month.

    ‘There are 120 students in my
    classroom. That’s more than any teacher can handle,’ said Ahmad.

    ‘For
    me, change would mean a better education system I can teach in and one
    that guarantees my students a good life after school. If there is
    democracy in my country, then I can ask for democracy in my own home.’

    Tamer Adly, a driver of one of the
    thousands of minibuses that ferry commuters around Cairo, said he was
    sick of the daily humiliation he felt from police who demand free rides
    and send him on petty errands, reflecting the widespread public anger at
    police high-handedness.

    ‘They would force me to share my
    breakfast with them … force me to go fetch them a newspaper. This
    country should not just be about one person,’ the 30-year-old lamented,
    referring to Mubarak.

    An effigy depicting President Hosni Mubarak is seen hanging on a traffic light in downtown Cairo today

    An effigy depicting President Hosni Mubarak is seen hanging on a traffic light in downtown Cairo today

    Symbolic: A close up shows a man stepping on a banner bearing a portrait of Hosni Mubarak reading in Arabic 'we demand that you leave' and shells of ammunition allegedly fired by security forces in the last days

    Symbolic: A close up shows a man stepping on a banner bearing a portrait of Hosni Mubarak reading in Arabic ‘we demand that you leave’ and shells of ammunition allegedly fired by security forces in the last days

    Time to go: Egyptian clergy gather in Cairo's Tahrir Square and chant slogans calling for the removal of Hosni Mubarak

    Time to go: Egyptian clergy gather in Cairo’s Tahrir Square and chant slogans calling for the removal of Hosni Mubarak

    Among the older protesters there was
    also a sense of amazement after three decades of unquestioned control by
    Mubarak’s security forces over the streets.

    ‘We could never say no to Mubarak
    when we were young, but our young people today proved that they can say
    no, and I’m here to support them,’ said Yusra Mahmoud, a 46-year-old
    school principal who said she had been sleeping in the square alongside
    other protesters for the past two nights.

    Dash of colour: A brightly dressed woman joins the crowds to pray and chant in Tahrir Square

    Dash of colour: A brightly dressed woman joins the crowds to pray and chant in Tahrir Square

    Women join the annti-government protesters in the march toward the Tahrir square

    Joining the throng: Women join the annti-government protesters in the march toward the Tahrir square

    Young blood: A mother carries her daughter on her shoulders with the word 'Masr' or 'Egypt' - a sign that protesters are hoping for a peaceful march

    Young blood: A mother carries her daughter on her shoulders with the word ‘Masr’ or ‘Egypt’ – a sign that protesters are hoping for a peaceful march

    AN TWITTER LIFELIFE FROM GOOGLE

    Google has launched a special service to allow people in Egypt to send Twitter messages by dialing a phone number and leaving a voicemail, as Internet access remains cut off in the country amid anti-government protests.

    ‘Like many people we’ve been glued to the news unfolding in Egypt and thinking of what we could do to help people on the ground,’ read a post on Google’s official corporate blog.

    The service, which Google said was developed with engineers from Twitter, allows people to dial a telephone number and leave a voicemail.

    The voicemail is automatically translated into an audio file message that is sent on Twitter using the identifying tag £egypt, Google said.

    Among those who have Tweeted from
    Cairo were New York Times journalist Nicholas Kristof who warned that
    the sense of anticipation reminded him of a previous tragedy in China.

    He
    wote: ‘Fabulous, giddy mood at Tahrir. Love the campfires. But 1
    troubling thought: Tiananmen was the same before the shooting.’

    Google said in the blog post, titled ‘Some weekend work that will (hopefully) enable more Egyptians to be heard,’ that no Internet connection is needed to use the service.

    It listed listed three phone numbers for people to call to use the service, which are: +16504194196 or +390662207294 or +97316199855.

    A
    leaflet has circulated saying it was time for the military to choose
    between Mubarak and the people, and a frequently heard chant promised:
    ‘He only needs a push!’

    Yesterday Vice President Omar Suleiman – appointed by Mubarak only two days earlier – went on state TV to announce the offer of a dialogue with ‘political forces’ for constitutional and legislative reforms.

    Suleiman did not say what the changes would entail or which groups the government would speak with.

    Opposition forces have long demanded the lifting of restrictions on who is eligible to run for president to allow a real challenge to the ruling party, as well as measures to ensure elections are fair.

    A presidential election is scheduled for September.

    However, Sir Andrew Green, former director of the Middle East for the Foreign Office, warned that there would be ‘chaos’ for some time to come in Egypt.

    Sir Andrew told Channel 4 News: ‘The
    Army has said they will not use force against the demonstrators. That to
    me spells the end of the Mubarak regime.’

    The
    retired diplomat warned that the West would miss the stability that
    President Mubarak gave as Egypt was now in a ‘revoluntionary’ stage.

    ‘In Egypt, there is no prince over the water waiting to take over.’

    Even
    if democracy prevails, Sir Andrew said ‘There is no way they can in a
    very short amount of time produce a stable and balanced government.’

    The U.S. is working diplomatic
    channels behind the scenes in a bid to smooth any governmental
    transition, yet it seems to have abandoned any support for Mubarak.

    White
    House spokesman Robert Gibbs dismissed the new government, saying the
    situation in Egypt calls for action, not appointments.

    Slogan: A protester complains at the cutting off of internet services in Egypt

    Slogan: A protester complains at the cutting off of internet services in Egypt to restrict the protests

    Publicly, the Obama administration has declined to discuss the subject of Mubarak’s future. However, it is believed that Washington prefers that Mubarak does not contest the upcoming vote.

    The State Department sent a retired senior diplomat – former ambassador to Egypt Frank Wisner – to meet Egyptian officials in Cairo to urge them to embrace broad economic and political changes that can pave the way for free and fair elections.

    The army statement, aired on state
    TV, said the powerful military recognizes ‘the legitimacy of the
    people’s demands’ – the strongest sign yet that it is willing to let the
    protests continue and even grow as long as they remain peaceful, even
    if that leads to the fall of Mubarak.

    If
    the president, a former air force commander, loses the
    support of the military, it would likely be a fatal blow to his rule.

    LOOTERS PILLAGE ARTEFACTS FROM EGYPYT’S ANCIENT PAST

    Smashed open: Looters targeted the world-renown Egyptian Museum and hurled mummy parts over the floor

    Looters targeted the world-renown Egyptian Museum and hurled mummy parts over the floor

    Looters have pillaged a number of warehouses containing ancient Egyptian artefacts, stealing and damaging some of them.

    A group of looters attacked a warehouse at the Qantara Museum near the city of Ismailia on the Suez Canal that contained 3,000 objects from the Roman and Byzantine periods, a source at the tourism police said.

    Many of the objects had been found in Sinai by the Israelis after they occupied the peninsula during the 1967 war with Egypt, and had only been recently returned to Egypt.

    A worker at the warehouse said the looters had said they were searching for gold. The worker told them there was no gold but they continued to pillage the storehouse, smashing some items and taking others.

    An archaeologist said warehouses near the pyramids of Saqqara and Abu Sir were also looted.

    ‘At other locations, guards and villagers were able to successfully repel gangs of looters,’ the archaeologist said.

    On Friday, looters broke into the Cairo museum, home to the world’s greatest collection of Pharaonic treasures, smashing several statues and damaging two mummies, while police battled anti-government protesters on the streets.

    The culture, monuments, temples and pyramids of ancient Egypt have left a lasting legacy on the world and are a major draw for the country’s tourism industry.

    For days, army tanks and troops have
    surrounded Tahrir Square, keeping the protests confined but doing
    nothing to stop people from joining.

    Military
    spokesman Ismail Etman said the military ‘has not and will not use
    force against the public’ and underlined that ‘the freedom of peaceful
    expression is guaranteed for everyone.’

    He
    added the caveats, however, that protesters should not commit ‘any act
    that destabilizes security of the country’ or damage property.

    Looting
    that erupted over the weekend across the city of around 18 million has
    eased – but Egyptians endured another day of the virtual halt of normal
    life, raising fears of damage to the economy if the crisis drags on.

    Trains
    stopped running yesterday, possibly an attempt by authorities to
    prevent residents of the provinces from joining protests in the capital.

    A curfew imposed for a fourth straight day – starting an hour earlier, at 3pm – was widely ignored.

    Banks, schools and the stock market in Cairo were closed for the second working day, making cash tight.

    An
    unprecedented complete shutdown of the Internet was also in its fourth
    day. Long lines formed outside bakeries as people tried to replenish
    their stores of bread.

    Cairo’s
    international airport was a scene of chaos as thousands of foreigners
    sought to flee the unrest, and countries around the world scrambled to
    send in planes to fly their citizens out.

    Today there were more than 18,000 passengers stranded there as food supplies dwindled and airport staff were thin on the ground.

    Some tourists even reported being forced to pay bribes to policemen before being permitted to board what planes did manage to take off.

    But as the struggle for calm continues, there are serious doubts about what will follow if Mubarak is toppled.

    Can this eruption of anger largely by grass-roots activists coalesce into a unified political leadership?

    There
    were signs yesterday of an attempt to do so with around 30
    representatives from various opposition groups meeting to work out a
    joint stance.

    They are
    scheduled to meet again today to continue the discussions but unity is
    far from certain among groups with sometimes conflicting agendas.

    There
    are students, online activists, grass-roots organizers, old-school
    opposition politicians and the fundamentalist Muslim Brotherhood, along
    with everyday citizens drawn by the exhilaration of marching against the
    government.

    Q&A egypt.jpg

    Evacuation plan: Foreign Secretary William Hague tells the House of Commons today that Egypt needs a 'broad-based government' that will allow an 'orderly transition' in the country

    Evacuation plan: Foreign Secretary William Hague tells the House of Commons today that Egypt needs a ‘broad-based government’ that will allow an ‘orderly transition’ in the country

    The various protesters have little in common beyond the demand that Mubarak go.

    Perhaps
    the most significant tensions among them is between young secular
    activists and the Muslim Brotherhood, which wants to form an Islamist
    state in the Arab world’s largest nation.

    The
    more secular are deeply suspicious as the Brotherhood aims to co-opt
    what they contend is a spontaneous, popular movement. American officials
    have suggested they have similar fears.

    The outlawed Muslim Brotherhood remains Egypt’s largest opposition movement.

    In a nod to the suspicions, Brotherhood figures insist they are not seeking a leadership role.

    ‘We don’t want to harm this revolution,’ Mohamed Mahdi Akef, a former leader of the group.

    Cairo airport yesterday was a scene of near-chaos as thousands of holidaymakers tried to get home from Egypt.

    An stmiated 18,000 are still stuck
    there today, although many British citizens and other holidaymakers in
    Sharm el Sheikh and the Red Sea resorts are staying put.

    Britain
    will send a charter aircraft to Egypt tomorrow to bring back Britons
    who wish to leave, Foreign Secretary William Hague told the Commons
    today.

    ‘I have …
    decided to send a charter aircraft to enable further British nationals
    to leave the country if they wish to do so,’ he said.

    ‘That
    will set off for Egypt tomorrow and I will send further flights if
    necessary, just to make sure that people are able to leave if they wish
    to do so,’ he said.

    Map detailing the evacuation of foreign nationals from Egypt


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    Mystery Missile Launch Seen off Calif. Coast

    November 10, 2010 by admin  
    Filed under Featured Stories, World News

    Military Mum on Nature of “Big Missile” Rising Out of Pacific – a Possible Show of U.S. Military Might

    (CBS) A mysterious missile launch off the southern California coast was caught by CBS affiliate KCBS’s cameras Monday night, and officials are staying tight-lipped over the nature of the projectile.

    CBS station KFMB put in calls to the Navy and Air Force Monday night about the striking launch off the coast of Los Angeles, which was easily visible from the coast, but the military has said nothing about the launch.

    KFMB showed video of the apparent missile to former U.S. Ambassador to NATO Robert Ellsworth, who is also a former Deputy Secretary of Defense, to get his thoughts.

    Scroll down for KFMB video showing the launch.

    “It’s spectacular… It takes people’s breath away,” said Ellsworth, calling the projectile, “a big missile”.

    Magnificent images were captured by the KCBS news helicopter in L.A. around sunset Monday evening. The location of the missile was about 35 miles out to sea, west of L.A. and north of Catalina Island.

    A Navy spokesperson told KFMB it wasn’t their missile. He said there was no Navy activity reported in the area Monday evening.

    On Friday night, Vandenberg Air Force Base, in California, launched a Delta II rocket, carrying an Italian satellite into orbit, but a sergeant at the base told KFMB there had been no launches since then.

    Ellsworth urged American to wait for definitive answers to come from the military.

    When asked, however, what he thought it might be, the former ambassador said it could possibly have been a missile test timed as a demonstration of American military might as President Obama tours Asia.

    “It could be a test-firing of an intercontinental ballistic missile from a submarine … to demonstrate, mainly to Asia, that we can do that,” speculated Ellsworth.

    Ellsworth said such tests were carried out in the Atlantic to demonstrate America’s power to the Soviets, when there was a Soviet Union, but he doesn’t believe an ICBM has previously been tested by the U.S. over the Pacific.

    Officially, at least, the projectile remains a mystery missile.

    ©MMX, CBS Interactive Inc.. All Rights Reserved.

    Civilian Tactical Teens?

    May 15, 2009 by admin  
    Filed under Featured Stories, World News

    Not the Boy Scouts of yesteryear

    boyscoutswithguns

    Photo credit: Todd Krainin / New York Times

    The United States of America has changed. Naturally, the Boy Scouts of America must change with it. But arming them with airsoft guns and conducting simulations to teach how to fight terrorism, chase down illegal immigrants and raid marijuana fields?

    Whatever happened to a campfire and hot dog roast?

    The New York Times hits the mother lode:

    The Explorers program, a coeducational affiliate of the Boy Scouts of America that began 60 years ago, is training thousands of young people in skills used to confront terrorism, illegal immigration and escalating border violence — an intense ratcheting up of one of the group’s longtime missions to prepare youths for more traditional jobs as police officers and firefighters.

    [...]

    The training, which leaders say is not intended to be applied outside the simulated Explorer setting, can involve chasing down illegal border crossers as well as more dangerous situations that include facing down terrorists and taking out “active shooters,” like those who bring gunfire and death to college campuses. In a simulation here of a raid on a marijuana field, several Explorers were instructed on how to quiet an obstreperous lookout.

    “Put him on his face and put a knee in his back,” a Border Patrol agent explained. “I guarantee that he’ll shut up.”

    The Explorers group, based out of Irving, Texas, has not suffered much controversy over its law enforcement training for scouts.

    However, in at least a dozen instances over the last 10 years, law enforcement officials in the Explorer program have been charged with sexually assaulting scouts, the paper added.

    Read the rest, even if you’re flinching already.

    – Stephen C. Webster

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